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Trevor Noah – Any leader tweeting policy is ridiculous

Trevor Noah – Any leader tweeting policy is ridiculous

It’s frighting to see how quickly you can repeat the ills of the past when enough people are afraid and hungry

As a kid he was literally a crime in one of the most unjust societies in the world. As an adult he has become one of the most well known voices in the world. The story of Trevor Noah is interesting and inspiring. Not inspiring as in ‘you too can become a TV star’, but as in ‘even in bleak times things can change for the better, and no matter who you are you can be a part of that!’

Please enjoy this conversation with Trevor Noah, first published by Al Jazeera on February 11th, 2017.

Posted by Børge A. Roum on

Sam Harris – Death and the present moment

Sam Harris – Death and the present moment

The reality of death is something we’re all going to have to face.

Since the last two episodes where talks from great men who died too young this is a good time to meditate a bit on life and death.

Sam Harris is a well known atheist with some controversial ideas and statements, but you don’t have to agree with him on anything to find something worth contemplating in this talk about how to handle death, and life, as an atheist.

At about 30 minutes in you might want to find a chair and sit down for about 7 minutes.

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Hans Rosling – The magic washing machine

Hans Rosling – The magic washing machine

Hans Rosling enthusiastically giving the speech The magic washing machine at TEDWoman 2010

Hans Rosling was unique in his ability to make statistics fun and fascinating – by his enthusiasm and his fantastic way of visualizing data. In this talk he leaves us wondering how anyone can live without the washing machine, and what we can do to make sure no one will. Thank you for everything you’ve done, Hans Rosling!

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Aaron Swartz – How we stopped SOPA

Aaron Swartz – How we stopped SOPA

fall in New England, CC BY Quinn Norton

Today, four years ago, the world woke up to the news that Aaron had committed suicide the evening before. This first Kurator talk is not about that, but it is related: It is a story about how incredibly powerful companies wanted to use copyright to censor the internet, and how the internet fought back. It is the amazing story about how ordinary people can make the world a better place, in the face of overwhelming odds.